Need to know the working logic of SVN hooks

Thenmozhi
Thenmozhi
If we use any hook in SVN, does it mean that the SVN call a second process for the hook script and if the hook invokes some other executable like SVNLook.exe, will it be the third process??    Can anyone explain me the working concept of SVN Hooks and how the processes are handled and invoked within the hook as i'm new to this.    Any help will be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.

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squeekjjy
squeekjjy
svn hav different hook templates : below is a description  start-commit This is run before the commit transaction is even created. It is typically used to decide if the user has commit privileges at all. The repository passes two arguments to this program: the path to the repository, and username which is attempting the commit. If the program returns a non-zero exit value, the commit is stopped before the transaction is even created. If the hook program writes data to stderr, it will be marshalled back to the client.  pre-commit This is run when the transaction is complete, but before it is committed. Typically, this hook is used to protect against commits that are disallowed due to content or location (for example, your site might require that all commits to a certain branch include a ticket number from the bug tracker, or that the incoming log message is non-empty). The repository passes two arguments to this program: the path to the repository, and the name of the transaction being committed. If the program returns a non-zero exit value, the commit is aborted and the transaction is removed. If the hook program writes data to stderr, it will be marshalled back to the client.  The Subversion distribution includes some access control scripts (located in the tools/hook-scripts directory of the Subversion source tree) that can be called from pre-commit to implement fine-grained write-access control. Another option is to use the mod_authz_svn Apache httpd module, which provides both read and write access control on individual directories (see the section called “Per-Directory Access Control”). In a future version of Subversion, we plan to implement access control lists (ACLs) directly in the filesystem.  post-commit This is run after the transaction is committed, and a new revision is created. Most people use this hook to send out descriptive emails about the commit or to make a backup of the repository. The repository passes two arguments to this program: the path to the repository, and the new revision number that was created. The exit code of the program is ignored.  The Subversion distribution includes mailer.py and commit-email.pl scripts (located in the tools/hook-scripts/ directory of the Subversion source tree) that can be used to send email with (and/or append to a log file) a description of a given commit. This mail contains a list of the paths that were changed, the log message attached to the commit, the author and date of the commit, as well as a GNU diff-style display of the changes made to the various versioned files as part of the commit.  Another useful tool provided by Subversion is the hot-backup.py script (located in the tools/backup/ directory of the Subversion source tree). This script performs hot backups of your Subversion repository (a feature supported by the Berkeley DB database back-end), and can be used to make a per-commit snapshot of your repository for archival or emergency recovery purposes.  pre-revprop-change Because Subversion's revision properties are not versioned, making modifications to such a property (for example, the svn:log commit message property) will overwrite the previous value of that property forever. Since data can be potentially lost here, Subversion supplies this hook (and its counterpart, post-revprop-change) so that repository administrators can keep records of changes to these items using some external means if they so desire. As a precaution against losing unversioned property data, Subversion clients will not be allowed to remotely modify revision properties at all unless this hook is implemented for your repository.  This hook runs just before such a modification is made to the repository. The repository passes four arguments to this hook: the path to the repository, the revision on which the to-be-modified property exists, the authenticated username of the person making the change, and the name of the property itself.  post-revprop-change As mentioned earlier, this hook is the counterpart of the pre-revprop-change hook. In fact, for the sake of paranoia this script will not run unless the pre-revprop-change hook exists. When both of these hooks are present, the post-revprop-change hook runs just after a revision property has been changed, and is typically used to send an email containing the new value of the changed property. The repository passes four arguments to this hook: the path to the repository, the revision on which the property exists, the authenticated username of the person making the change, and the name of the property itself.  The Subversion distribution includes a propchange-email.pl script (located in the tools/hook-scripts/ directory of the Subversion source tree) that can be used to send email with (and/or append to a log file) the details of a revision property change. This mail contains the revision and name of the changed property, the user who made the change, and the new property value.   Warning  Do not attempt to modify the transaction using hook scripts. A common example of this would be to automatically set properties such as svn:eol-style or svn:mime-type during the commit. While this might seem like a good idea, it causes problems. The main problem is that the client does not know about the change made by the hook script, and there is no way to inform the client that it is out-of-date. This inconsistency can lead to surprising and unexpected behavior.  Instead of attempting to modify the transaction, it is much better to check the transaction in the pre-commit hook and reject the commit if it does not meet the desired requirements.  Subversion will attempt to execute hooks as the same user who owns the process which is accessing the Subversion repository. In most cases, the repository is being accessed via Apache HTTP server and mod_dav_svn, so this user is the same user that Apache runs as. The hooks themselves will need to be configured with OS-level permissions that allow that user to execute them. Also, this means that any file or programs (including the Subversion repository itself) accessed directly or indirectly by the hook will be accessed as the same user. In other words, be alert to potential permission-related problems that could prevent the hook from performing the tasks you've written it to perform.
Thenmozhi
Thenmozhi
Thanks for the detailed explanation.  I have read all these information over online. But still i need to know working logic of hooks at process levels in the machine where SVN Server is running. Like whether the post-commit.bat will run as a separate process and if i invoke any other script within that bat, will that run as another process??  Can anyone please clarify me in this point of view regarding SVN hooks.
philip
philip
Yes, the Subversion libraries start up another process to run the hook scripts.

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